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Vermont Town & Community Information
  • Windham Vermont
  • Brattleboro Vermont
  • Rutland Vermont
  • Killington Vermont

  • About Windham Vermont
    Town in Windham County, Vermont, United States. The population was 328 at the 2000 census.

    Geography

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 26.1 square miles (67.7 km²), of which, 26.1 square miles (67.5 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.15%) is water.

    Demographics

    As of the census of 2000, there were 328 people, 150 households, and 91 families residing in the town. The population density was 12.6 people per square mile (4.9/km²). There were 354 housing units at an average density of 13.6/sq mi (5.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.04% White, 0.30% African American, 0.30% Asian, 0.91% from other races, and 2.44% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.22% of the population.

    There were 150 households out of which 21.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 3.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.3% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.76.

    In the town the population was spread out with 19.2% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 24.7% from 45 to 64, and 22.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 115.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 117.2 males.

    The median income for a household in the town was $39,659, and the median income for a family was $41,786. Males had a median income of $27,500 versus $23,125 for females. The per capita income for the town was $20,704. About 2.2% of families and 6.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.7% of those under age 18 and 4.9% of those age 65 or over.


    About Rutland Vermont
    Rutland City or Rutland Town -
    Rutland is located at 43°36′N, 72°59′W, elevation 164.6 m (540 ft).

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.67 square miles (19.87 km²), of which, 7.6 square miles (19.8 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.52%) is water.

    Transportation

    Rutland is the terminal city for Amtrak's Ethan Allen Express, which provides daily service to and from New York City.

    Rutland has "The Bus," run by Marble Valley Regional Transit District, an inter-city bus system costing 50 cents per person, with other expenses covered largely by taxpayers. "The Bus" was free prior to 2007, when the 50 cents fare was added to control the added gas expenses. MVRTD is housed in the downtown Transit Center, along with Vermont Transit Lines, Inc., a subsidiary of Greyhound Bus Lines, Inc.

    The Rutland Southern Vermont Regional Airport is located just south of the city, in North Clarendon. The airport offers daily flights to and from Boston.

    Rutland is the largest city in Vermont that is not located on, or near, either of the state's two major Interstate highways. U.S. Route 4 and U.S. Route 7 intersect in Rutland and are the two main routes into the city. U.S. 7 connects Rutland with Manchester and Bennington to the south, and with Middlebury and Burlington to the north. To the east of Rutland, U.S. 4 travels through Killington and Woodstock on its way toward New Hampshire. To the west, U.S. 4 has been rebuilt as a 4-lane freeway to the New York state line, a distance of just over 18 miles. It is currently the only limited-access freeway to serve Rutland. The former route of U.S. 4, which runs parallel to the freeway portion, is now signed as Vermont Route 4A.

    Demographics

    As of the census of 2000, there were 17,292 people, 7,452 households, and 4209 families residing in the city. The population density was 2254.5 people per square mile (870.3/km²). There were 7,452 housing units at an average density of 94.49/sq mi (289.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.6% White, 0.7% African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. 0.9% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

    There were 7,452 households out of which 21.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.8% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.5% were non-families. 36.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.80.

    In the city the population was spread out with 22.7% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 22.4% from 45 to 64, and 18.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.3 years. For every 100 females there were 89.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.5 males.

    History

    The city began as a small hamlet called Mill Village on Otter Creek in the town of Rutland in the early part of the Nineteenth century. In the early 1800s, small high-quality marble deposits were discovered in Rutland, and in the 1830s a large deposit of nearly solid marble of high quality was found in what is now West Rutland. By the 1840s small firms had begun operations, but marble quarries only became profitable when the railroad came to Rutland in 1851. The famous quarries of Carrara in Tuscany, Italy became largely unworkable because of their extreme depth at the same time; Rutland quickly became one of the leading producers of marble in the world

    This fueled enough growth and investment that in 1886 the marble companies saw to it that the center of town was incorporated as Rutland village, and most of the town was split off as West Rutland and Proctor, which contained the bulk of the marble quarries. Rutland City was incorporated as Vermont's third city on November 18, 1892. The new city's first mayor was John A. Mead, who served only one term in 1893.

    In 1894, the nation's first polio outbreak was identified in the Rutland area. 132 people from the Rutland area were affected. Seven died. 110 others suffered some paralysis for life. 55 were from the city itself.

    The closing of the marble quarries in the area in the 1980s and 1990s cost the area jobs.

    In the early 1970s, the Rutland Halloween Parade was used as the setting of a number of superhero comic books, including Batman #237, Justice League of America #103, Freedom Fighters #6, Amazing Adventures #16, Avengers #83, and The Mighty Thor #207.

    The Summer Concert Series once featured the punk rock and metal music festival Punk In The Park. This was discontinued after five years by the city because of alleged unruly behavior by attendees in the Main Street Park, though no official reports of any sort were ever filed.

    Economy

    One measure of economic activity is retail sales. Rutland stood third in the state in 2007 with $321.6 million.

    Personal income

    The median income for a household in the city was $30,478, and the median income for a family was $41,561. Males had a median income of $29,457 versus $23,688 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,075. 15.4% of the population and 10.3% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 30.1% are under the age of 18 and 10.5% are 65 or older.

    Industry

    Major area employers are General Electric, OMYA and Central Vermont Public Service.

    Recently, a one acre area of land downtown known as "the pit", is slated for development. The new office building is planned to hold offices, education and civic space.

    A judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit holds the Vermont seat here.

    Culture

    Rutland contains the Vermont State Fairgrounds. Downtown is the Rutland Free Library, the Paramount Theater and Merchant's Row, a restored street of dating back to the mid 1800s. One hundred and eight buildings in downtown Rutland are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Rutland also has a 275-acre (1.11 km²) Pine Hill Park offering mountain biking, hiking, and other outdoor recreation. At the park's entrance is the FlipSide Skate Park, municipally operated in an open-sided closed roof arena at the Giorgetti Athletic Complex. Rutland is also home to the Diamond Run Mall, which is Vermont's third largest shopping center.

    Rutland is host to summer events: Art In The Park and Friday Night Live, a Farmer's Market in downtown Rutland's Depot Park, and the Summer Concert Series.

    Rutland has hosted the annual Rutland Halloween Parade since 1960. The event celebrated its 48th anniversary in 2007.

    Media

    Rutland's news comes from the Rutland Herald. There are six radio stations in the broadcast area: 94.5 WDVT, 98.1 WJJR, 105.3 WJEN, 101.5 The FOX, 97.1 Z97, and 1380AM WSYB.

    The Rutland City Police Department is often featured on the truTV television show Speeders.

    Hospital

    Rutland Regional Medical Center is Vermont's second-largest health care facility, with 188 inpatient beds and 120 physicians.


    About Killington Vermont

    Killington is a town in Rutland County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,095 at the 2000 census. The town is also home to a well-known ski resort of the same name.

    The town was previously named Sherburne, but on March 2, 1999, the town voted to change its name to Killington. This was approved by the Vermont General Assembly on April 27, 1999.

    Geography

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 46.9 square miles (121.4 km²), of which, 46.6 square miles (120.8 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.6 km²) of it (0.47%) is water. The Ottauquechee River has its headwaters in the town.

    Surrounding areas

    • Pittsfield, Stockbridge
    • Bridgewater
    • Plymouth; Mendon
    • Chittenden

    Demographics

    As of the census of 2000, there were 1,095 people, 500 households, and 282 families residing in the town. The population density was 23.5 people per square mile (9.1/km²). There were 2,528 housing units at an average density of 54.2/sq mi (20.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.63% White, 0.37% African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.64% Asian, and 1.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.91% of the population.

    There were 500 households out of which 25.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.6% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.6% were non-families. 34.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.80.

    In the town the population was spread out with 20.5% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 29.4% from 25 to 44, 33.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 115.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 116.7 males.

    The median income for a household in the town was $47,500, and the median income for a family was $60,125. Males had a median income of $36,618 versus $27,368 for females. The per capita income for the town was $32,066. About 6.4% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.6% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.

    History

    The town was originally named Killington but in 1800 changed its name to Sherburne. In 1999 the name was changed back to Killington because of confusion.

    The 2007 Town Meeting considered a proposal to impose a three cent surcharge on every dollar of property tax revenue. The proceeds would have been used to fund a town economic development group. The surcharge was not approved by the voters.

    Secession referendums

    Killington's voters have twice voted to secede from Vermont and join the state of New Hampshire 25 miles to the east. The movement stems from what some residents perceive as an inequity in taxes sent to the state of Vermont, and services received. The votes are largely symbolic, as secession would require the agreement of both states' legislatures and the U.S. Congress.


    About Brattleboro Vermont

    Brattleboro originated with the founding of Fort Dummer in 1724. The town was chartered in 1753.

    The Brattleboro postmaster issued the first postal stamps in the United States in 1846.

    The town was the home of Rudyard Kipling's wife. Kipling himself lived for a time in the town.

    The first person ever to receive a Social Security benefit check, issued on January 31, 1940 to Ida Fuller from Brattleboro. Her check number was 00-000-001 and it was for $22.54.

    In 1950, Brattleboro had a population of 11,522.

    Geography

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 32.5 square miles (84.0 km²), of which, 32.0 square miles (82.9 km²) is land and 0.5 square miles (1.2 km², 1.42%) is water. Brattleboro is located at 42°51′15″N, 72°33′31″W.

    Topography

    The town largely rests in what is known as the Connecticut River Valley. Along the eastern edge is the Connecticut River. An extensive network of hills and mountains surrounds the town in all directions.

    Development

    The town's most densely populated area is downtown, at the very bottom of the valley. Because of the area's very hilly terrain, and relatively little flat land, many buildings are on steep grades, bunched closely together. This topography has helped to create an urban atmosphere.

    Downtown Brattleboro, as seen looking across the Connecticut River from New Hampshire.

    Since the 1950s, suburban development occurred outside of the traditional downtown and in the west, south, and north of the township. The southern section of the town is predominantly one or two family houses with a mix of triple deckers. Commercial and industrial operations play a relatively minor role in this section of town, with heavy concentration on the U.S. Route 5/Canal Street artery that cuts through the area. The town's high school and the Regional Career Center are also located in this section.

    The western section of town, which formally became a village in 2005, is also mostly residential, with the state's largest mobile home park and several large planned developments.

    The northern section of Brattleboro developed in the 1960s and 1970s. The area has almost no residential development and is dominated by large commercial and industrial establishments along Putney Road, including roughly seven major hotels located within a short distance of each other. C&S Wholesale Grocers made its headquarters in this section until moving to Keene, New Hampshire in 2005; because of close proximity to Interstate 91, C&S has kept a major portion of its shipping operations in Brattleboro.

    The outskirts of Brattleboro have a decidedly rural feel, with very little housing development and boasting the last few farms left in Brattleboro after the collapse of the dairy industry in the 1970s. At its peak, the area had over 170 farms; there are now only nine left. Brattleboro is also the headquarters of the Holstein Association.

    Government

    Brattleboro's citizens are represented by a Select Board and Town Manager. Five members are elected to fill three one year seats and two three year seats. The Select Board, in cooperation with the Town Manager, are in charge of addressing all general public issues brought to them, concerning the town. The Town Manager form of government is unique in that, unlike a mayor who is elected for a term, the Town Manager is appointed by the Selectboard.

    The town has three districts and representatives from those districts gather on Town Meeting Day to discuss and vote on issues.

    Shopping and dining

    T.J. Buckley's restaurant in uptown Brattleboro.

    Vermont is a popular weekend getaway among wealthy New York and Connecticut tourists. Brattleboro, being the first major town over the Vermont border on Interstate 91, offers a mix of a rural atmosphere and urban amenities such as a large number of hotels. Celebrities who have visited Brattleboro include Bill Cosby, Johnny Depp, Whoopi Goldberg, Robin Williams, Eminem and Nicole Kidman.

    Brattleboro is a host to a number of art galleries and stores including Vermont Artisan Design, the largest store of original artworks in the area.

    The Brattleboro Food Cooperative, a natural foods store and deli holds the claim of being the state's first certified organic retailer. In 2007, Brattleboro passed the Fairtrade town resolution, clearing the way to become the second Fairtrade certified town in the nation, joining Media, Pennsylvania.

    Transportation

    Rail

    Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, operates its Vermonter service daily through Brattleboro, between Washington, D.C. and St. Albans, Vermont.

    Bus

    The Brattleboro BeeLine operates throughout the town between 6:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m., and is comprised of the Red Line and Blue Line buses which work in conjunction with each other to move residents throughout the T shaped layout of town. Bus services also run daily between Brattleboro and Bellows Falls, and between Brattleboro and Whitingham.

    In addition, Brattleboro is serviced daily by the national bus service Greyhound, which operates out of its terminal just south of the exit three interchange.

    Highway

    Brattleboro is serviced by two major routes and one Interstate route. New England Interstate Route 9 runs from the New York border with Vermont, west of Bennington, traveling east through downtown Brattleboro, then running north to the New Hampshire border. Route 9's local names within Brattleboro include Molly Stark Trail, Marlboro Road, Western Avenue, High Street, Main Street, and Putney Road. Route 9 runs concurrently with U.S. Route 5 from the intersection of Main and High Streets north to meet Interstate 91 Exit 3.

    U.S. Route 5 enters Brattleboro at its border with the town of Guilford and runs northerly, through downtown, and eventually exits Brattleboro at its border with Dummerston, Vermont. Route 5's local names are as follows (from beginning to end in Brattleboro) Canal Street, Main Street, Putney Road. Southbound, Route 5 also runs along Park Place and a part of Linden Street, following a one-way triangle at the north end of Main Street.

    Interstate 91, originating in Connecticut and terminating at the Canadian border, runs through the town in a north-south direction, in a semi-circumferential manner around the town center. Exit one serves the southern part of town; exit two serves the western section of town with connection to local ski areas via State Route 9; exit three serves the northern section of town with connection to the bridge to New Hampshire.

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